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Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Glorious Morning!

Today is watering day, so I got distracted with many things in the garden while moving the sprinklers around this morning. I noticed that we have some late bloomer pumpkins, cantaloupe, and various squash developing, as well as a second crop of roma and cherry tomatoes. I guess everything needed a little rest before ending things with a bang. I also noticed that the morning glories are finally going to seed, so I had to grab a container and start harvesting.

I've been growing morning glories for over 15 years, beginning at the ranch. The first year I planted them, I had massive amounts of blooms so I never had to purchase more seeds thereafter. I only had one color though, a deep violet purple. It's really cool to know that some of the current seeds I have were handed down from those original plants. This year I have some new, young plants in the mix. I bought some new morning glory seeds to add to the mix. I really wanted some different colors, so I added magenta, pink, light blue, medium blue with pink stripes, and a very very blue to name a few.

Morning glories are a very prolific vine. If you aren't careful, they can invade other plants. They creep up trees, along fences, and over anything it can grab onto and crawl up. We used this climbing tendency to our advantage however, and encouraged them to cover the fence that separates the neighbor's yard from our own. The fence is open wire and doesn't offer much privacy when it's bare, but it does provide a great climbing structure for the vines. The vines in the backyard get a lot more sun than the ones in the front, so the foliage is very thick.

Morning glories are also fascinating because they close up during the day when the sun hits them. During the morning, you can witness them in all their glory, hence the name, or on overcast days they may stay open until evening! I thought it was interesting to learn that they are a native of tropical America. They can produce up to 300 flowers a day! Morning glories are super easy to grow. They love loads of sun and poor soil. The perfect flower for the black thumb!

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